WV PROJECT SCOPE ECHO SERIES- Session 2: Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome and Having Difficult Conversations

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Project SCOPE is a training initiative intended to identify and train practitioners in current and emerging knowledge and evidence-based promising practices in screening, monitoring, and care for children diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) or neonatal opiate withdrawal syndrome (NOWS), or who are suspected of being impacted by opioid use and related trauma exposure.

Project SCOPE uses a cohort model where interdisciplinary team members from education, medical and community settings collaborate to provide didactic and case presentations to have an opportunity to problem-solve with peers across the state. A cohort community allows participants to network, develop relationships and learn from others who are serving similar populations.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) compared to typical fetal development
  • List one pharmacological and one non-pharmacological intervention for NAS
  • Discuss the parental experience and stigma related to mothers of children with NAS
  • Discuss the challenges and potential stigma families face related to parenting and NAS
  • Describe the strategies from a strengths-based approach to assist with difficult conversations with individuals, their families, providers, and others involved.

Participants can attend one, several or all sessions.
All sessions will be held from 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Target Audiences: Physicians, Nurses, Social Workers, Physical/Occupational Therapists, Speech Therapist, Psychologist, Home Visitors/Early Childhood (STARS), Students, Families, CPS, Judicial, Addiction & Prevention Professionals.

Continuing Education Credits Offered: Physician, Nursing, Social Work, STARS, PT, OT and WVAPP.

Contact Info: Email Sue Workman at charlotte.workman@hsc.wvu.edu

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